Book Recommendations

115 books.
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The Doctor's Quick Weight Loss Diet

The Stillman diet became the rage back in the 1960's and 1970's. Why? Because it works! Unless you’ve always been slim, chances are you’ve heard of the famous “ONE Pound A Day” weight loss diet created by Dr. Irwin Maxwell Stillman and Samm S. Baker. You probably know someone who has tried it with great success, if you haven’’t done so yourself. Don’t delay try it now because it works!! After all, it’’s a diet that sounds too good to be true. To shift those pounds quickly you simply need to start the day with bacon and eggs, snack on chunks of cheese and a variety of fish or meats, top coffee with cream and feast on steaks fried in butter or lobster. Not exactly the typical foods you'd find on the shopping lists of most slimmers who've grown up with the idea that a low-fat diet is the best way to lose weight. But like all things that sound too good to be true, there’s a catch. And in the case of the famous Stillman’s diet, it means that filling up on high-fat foods needs to be balanced by giving up most carbs including bread, potatoes, pasta, rice, chocolate, crisps, biscuits, cake –– even fruit, milk and some veg’s. But you never feel hungry and it’s an enjoyable and satisfying and more importantly a safe and effective weight loss plan. ONE POUND A DAY guaranteed just follow the diet.

The Doctor's Quick Weight Loss Diet

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Kabloona: Among the Inuit

n this classic of adventure, travel, anthropology, and spiritual awakening, de Poncins is a French nobleman who spent fifteen months in 1938 and 1939 living among the Inuit people of the Arctic. He is at first appalled by their way of life: eating rotten raw fish, sleeping with each others' wives, ignoring schedules, and helping themselves to his possessions. But as his odyssey continues, he is transformed from an uncomprehending outsider to someone who finds himself living as Inuk: a man, preeminently.


History Links with excerpts from the book relating to Carnivore.

https://www.carniway.nyc/history/kabloona-fish-seal-caribou-ox

https://www.carniway.nyc/history/father-henry-all-fish-diet-six-years https://www.carniway.nyc/history/kabloona-father-henry-six-years-carnivore-diet

https://www.carniway.nyc/history/eskimo-carnivorous-feast

https://www.carniway.nyc/history/effect-of-abundance-of-seal

https://www.carniway.nyc/history/kabloona-raw-fish-preferred-over-rice

https://www.carniway.nyc/history/kabloona-seal-hunt-butcher

Kabloona: Among the Inuit

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10

The Fat of the Land

Basically same book as Not by Bread Alone

The Fat of the Land

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10

Not by Bread Alone

Basically the same book as The Fat of the Land - Recommend getting this paperback!

Not by Bread Alone

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10

Cancer: disease of civilization?: An anthropological and historical study

Chapter

  1. The Problem Develops

  2. Captain Leavitt's Search for Cancer among the Eskimos

  3. Remote Origins of the Frontier Search for Cancer

  4. The Tanchou Principle at Home: In France and in Africa

  5. The Moravians Search for Cancer in Southwestern Alaska

  6. The Moravian Search in Northern Labrador

  7. A possible Early Cancer at Anderson River

  8. The Search for Cancer among the Forest Indians of Alaska

  9. The First Native Cancer is Recognized in Northern Alaska

  10. Cancer is Discovered among Labrador Eskimos

  11. Cancer is Reported from the Canadian Eastern Arctic

  12. The Tropical Life of the Polar Eskimos

  13. Tropical Winter Life at Point Barrow--1852 - 1883

  14. The Longetivity of "Primitive" Eskimos

  15. The Twentieth Century Forgets the Nineteenth

  16. The Twentieth Century Rediscovers the Nineteenth

  17. A "Cancer Free" People of Asia

  18. An Ounce of Prevention

"Not only does Dr. Stefansson give in the present book a detailed account of what he has seen and heard in the Arctic; he also compares his own observations with those reported by the anthropologists, physicians, and travelers who have been in contact with primitive people in other parts of the world. From this broad survey there emerges the impression that certain diseases such as dental caries, arteriosclerosis, and cancers are so uncommon among certain primitive people as to remain unnoticed--at least as long as nothing is changed in the ancestral ways of life."

"The Stone Age Eskimos had successfully met the challenges of the Arctic by empricial procedures developed slowly and progressively. In contrast, modern man cannot depend on slow empiricism to achieve fitness to his rapidly changing environment.It is the responsibility of social and medical sciences to analyze the natural and artificial forces which affect his health and happiness, in order to help him develop a rational way of life fitted to the new world he is creating." - Rene Dubos - Prof at Rockeller Institute-1960

Cancer: disease of civilization?: An anthropological and historical study

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10

Strong Medicine

Dr Blake J Donaldson, a NYC based doctor describes how he applies a meat-based diet to fix obesity, allergies, digestion and other common ailments. It's a fascinating look at how a doctor thinks around the mid 20th century. 


"I oberved two families, in practice, that bothered me. Several members of each family were fat and had come to me  for treatment. Fast weight reduction was in order, so they were given only two things with a meal, fat meat and black coffee. Both families seemed to have an inherent inability to convert protein into some carbohydrate, if that was the difficulty. They developed acidosis to the extent of a very offensive dead-violet odor on the breath and some sense of weakness. Switching over to slow weight reduction with three things with a meal had instantly resolved the difficulty. But why had it existed?


 Oh, there were dozens of questions I wanted to discuss with Stefansson, so Fred Taylor brought him out to my home on Long Island. Some steamed clams and a good steak loosened him up, and we sat around a beach fire and talked for hours. He proved to be a mine of information. As I remember his conversation, it went something like this: 


"Well, in the first place, it is just as well to have intelligent companions if you expect to live for long periods on sea ice. It isn't enough to pick up, at Point Barrow, a dock hand who is somewhat inured to cold weather. Men you take with you have no worry about scurvy. They know that fresh meat and fish entirely prevent that. And they know that there is always fresh water on the sea ice. They may be doubtful at first over their ability to get along without a few luxuries. At the end of several weeks the extras are discarded as not worth the effort of transporting. "Most people enjoy fresh fat meat from the start, but some react this way: they are expected to live on thin slivers of fat seal meat and the broth it is cooked in, and this is eagerly taken at first and then with increasing reluctance on the second and third day. By the fourth day the pieces of meat may be found on the snow or given to the dogs. For two or three days these men seem to eat almost nothing. Then appetite for the meat comes with a rush and no more trouble is experienced. After many months away from a base where there are grocery stores, elaborate menus may be planned against the day of return. During their time away they have been free from head colds, but as soon as they return to people who have been living on groceries, head colds are promptly contracted. A few days of living on the food they thought would be so wonderful usually finds them back in the Eskimo part of town trying to beg, borrow, or steal some delicious fat from the back of the eyes of a caribou, or else some good seal meat. Accustomed to fat in their food, their bodies seem to crave it, and groceries do not satisfy. 


"It is highly desirable to be a good rifle shot so that a seal may be shot through the head. Matches must be most carefully conserved. The technique of meal preparation is exact. Hollow bones and strips of blubber cut like bacon are saved from the day before. A pyramid is formed of the hollow bones. At the apex the strips of blubber are laid. A little piece of shirttail or similar cloth is reserved to help start each meal. The cloth is impregnated with fat and laid under the pyramid of bones. The cloth should light with one match. Exposed to this heat, the blubber melts and runs down over the bones, which act as a wick. This fat burns with an intensely hot but smoky flame. Over this a preferably unwelded solid metal container is placed, filled with water and thin slivers of fat meat. By the time the water boils, the meat is cooked and ready to eat. The broth it is cooked in is drunk and is much more satisfying than tea or coffee." So that was the way of it, was it? Just be sure you are right and then be tough about it. What was I worrying about? If Stefansson could get his people to live that way, I certainly should have enough executive ability to get my patients to stick to a beautifully broiled sirloin and a demitasse of black coffee."

Strong Medicine

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8

Discovery: The Autobiography of Vilhjalmur Stefansson

Explorer of the last unknown lands in North America prophet of the transpolar air and Arctic submarine routes, Vilhjalmur Stefansson was the inspiration of northern explorers for 40 years. In this book, completed just before his death in August 1962, he recalls his whole adventurous and exciting life, and the great achievements that made him a top authority on the Arctic and its people.


(I ordered and read the physical book and really liked it. Similar to his other carnivore books but about his whole life)

Discovery: The Autobiography of Vilhjalmur Stefansson

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10

Dr Carlton Frederick's Low Carbohydrate Diet

https://people.com/archive/nutritionist-carlton-fredericks-wants-to-take-die-out-of-diet-vol-3-no-13/


What food constitutes the largest threat to health in this country?

Sugar, without doubt. It is a condiment that is being used as a food, and it is killing us by the millions. Per capita, we consume 120 pounds of sugar each year—compared to only 12 pounds in George Washington’s day. Sugar accounts for around 20% of our calorie intake. The vitamins that are required to metabolize sugar and starch in the human body are B1, B2 and niacin. Sugar does not supply any of these and, in fact, displaces the foods that do. In addition to making us fat, wrecking our teeth and increasing clotting tendencies that could lead to coronary thrombosis, sugar unquestionably aggravates a serious ailment that is mushrooming in this country: hypoglycemia.


What is hypoglycemia?


A low blood-sugar condition that can simulate symptoms of neurosis, psychosis, gastric ulcer, migraines and even epilepsy. There is now evidence that hypoglycemia can become diabetes. Sugar worsens the condition by causing an excessive production of insulin.


Just how widespread is hypoglycemia?


Out of 5,000 GI’s given a glucose tolerance test recently, no fewer than 700 turned out to be suffering from low blood-sugar. People in critical jobs, such as airline pilots and traffic controllers, are especially susceptible because they practically live on sugared coffee and soft drinks. When United Airlines tested 177 of its pilots, 44 turned out to be hypoglycemic.

Dr Carlton Frederick's Low Carbohydrate Diet

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Your Heart Has 9 Lives

Builds case against saturated fat and cholesterol. Definitely an ANTI CarniWOE book, but included because it changed minds back in 1966. 

Your Heart Has 9 Lives

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Eat, drink, and get thin: The Last Diet Book You'll Ever Need

This book promotes that by following a high protein and fat (80 percent or more) and reducing carbohydrates (20 percent or less) weight loss will easily occur.

Eat, drink, and get thin: The Last Diet Book You'll Ever Need

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Pure, White, and Deadly: How Sugar Is Killing Us and What We Can Do to Stop It

More than 40 years before Gary Taubes published The Case Against Sugar, John Yudkin published his now-classic exposé on the dangers of sugar—reissued here with a new introduction by Robert H. Lustig, the bestselling author of Fat Chance.

Scientist John Yudkin was the first to sound the alarm about the excess of sugar in the diet of modern Americans. His classic exposé, Pure, White, and Deadly, clearly and engagingly describes how sugar is damaging our bodies, why we eat so much of it, and what we can do to stop. He explores the ins and out of sugar, from the different types—is brown sugar really better than white?—to how it is hidden inside our everyday foods, and how it is harming our health.

In 1972, Yudkin was mostly ignored by the health industry and media, but the events of the last forty years have proven him spectacularly right. Yudkin’s insights are even more important and relevant now, with today’s record levels of obesity, than when they were first published. Brought up-to-date by childhood obesity expert Dr. Robert H. Lustig, this emphatic treatise on the hidden dangers of sugar is essential reading for anyone concerned about their health, the health of their children, and the wellbeing of modern society.

Pure, White, and Deadly: How Sugar Is Killing Us and What We Can Do to Stop It

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8

Hunters of the Northern Ice

"To preserve the knowledge of the elder Eskimo hunters, amassed by hundreds of generations, he wrote the first account of Eskimo hunting techniques learned by direct participation. He regularly read back the record of his experiences to his hunting companions, who verbally edited it. He wrote so clearly that his reports served the Air Force as a practical guide to survival on the ice."

Hunters of the Northern Ice

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The Stone Age Diet: Based On In Depth Studies Of Human Ecology And The Diet Of Man

This book is a study of the ecology of Man, as his environment has changed with (relatively) lightning-like rapidity from prehistorical to modern times, and to delineate the effect these changes have had on nutrition. An attempt will be made to answer the question: “Is modern Man actually better or worse off nutritionally than was his Stone Age forbear?”

Writing this book has indeed been fun. While collecting material for the early chapters I was able to add greatly to my knowledge of comparative anatomy and physiology, how all various sorts of animals are constructed, and how their digestive tracts function. Later chapters led me into a fascinating world of the past, of anthropology and archaeology, which I embraced enthusiastically though amateurishly. Finally I ventured into the shadowy sphere of philosophy, explored some aspects of future food production, and have set down the dire predictions of population ecologists for the arrival of the 21st century. It has been thrilling to see how each bit of scientific data from such widely separated disciplines fitted together into a mosaic of such undeniable clarity that the aphorism: “That contrary to Nature cannot be fact”-was again verified, this time in the field of human dietetics and nutrition.

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Dismantling a Myth: The Role of Fat and Carbohydrates in Our Diet

The first edition of this book appeared in 1967. It was a courageous feat, at a time when fat was held to be responsible for coronary infarction and many other diseases, to recommend the restriction of nutritional carbohydrate to 60 - 70 grams per day. An organization supported by the German government had even stated, without offering plausible supporting evidence, that an office employee "requires" 350 grams of carbohydrate daily ... Lutz stirred up a hornet's nest! In the ensuing years evidence from other sources and his own extensive experience have confirmed the value of his concept. "Leben ohne Brot" has become almost a slogan and the appearance of this fifth edition is convincing evidence of the impact caused by Lutz's ideas on the medical and lay public.

This book is intended primarily but not exclusively for the medical profession. Observations on his own person combined with clinical experience were the starting point for the "Life without Bread" programme. Even those who can not entirely accept Lutz's concepts and hypotheses regarding pathogenesis cannot afford to ignore this book. Clinical observations cannot be talked out of existence nor should they be dismissed simply because they conflict with one's own theories. The value of a diet can only be judged on the basis of clinical experience and practical success, and does not depend upon biochemical and physiological explanations.

Lutz's book challenges physicians to gather data on a "Life without Bread". It is an appeal to us to document results in the prophylaxis and therapy of adiposity, peptic ulcers, ulcerative colitis, hepatitis, arteriosclerosis and coronary infarction as well as to record our form of diet on which mankind lived for at least two millions years.

Prof. Hans Glatzel, Gross Groenau, Luebeck
Specialist in Internal Medicine,
Formerly Head of the Department of Clinical Physiology at the Max Planck Institute for Nutritional Physiology, Dortmund, West Germany

Dismantling a Myth: The Role of Fat and Carbohydrates in Our Diet

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Protein Power: The High-Protein/Low-Carbohydrate Way to Lose Weight, Feel Fit, and Boost Your Health--in Just Weeks

Lose weight, feel fitter, lower your cholesterol, and enjoy the foods you never thought you'd eat again! A rasher of bacon, a juicy steak, a wedge of cheese, a buttery omelet...Now, a team of pioneering doctors shows you how their groundbreaking, protein-rich eating plan succeeds where low-fat diets fail-- to help you take off the weight and achieve optimal health naturally, without counting fat grams, without worrying about fat percentages, and without going up the foods you love! Finally, a diet you can live with that works.

PROTEIN POWER

Based on cutting-edge research, this revolutionary, medically sound, deliciously satisfying plan has already helped thousands of patients lose weight and achieve other lifesaving health benefits, including lower cholesterol and blood pressure readings and an improvement or reversal of common disorders such as heart disease, adult-onset diabetes, and gout. Developed by Doctors Michael and Mary Dan Eades, the simple regimen calls for a new way of eating: a protein-rich, moderate-fat, low-carbohydrate diet that will have you feeling better and more energetic within a week, and correct blood sugar levels, high blood pressure, and elevated cholesterol within three weeks.

Here, the Eades show you why their plan is so potent: how it works with your body's metabolic biochemistry; how it brings powerful metabolic hormones, including insulin, into balance; and why this balance is necessary to achieve permanent weight loss and free you from reliance on costly and dangerous medications to control blood pressure and cholesterol.

Divided into two phases, one for those who need to lose 20 percent of their body weight or more, and the other for those closer to their ideal weight who simply wish to recompose their muscle-fat ratio and embark on a healthier lifestyle, the Eades' regimen relies on a tasty, filling, nutritionally complete diet that even allows for the consumption of alcohol-- in moderation. Their breakthrough system of counting carbohydrates gives you many more food options than other low-carbohydrate programs.  And they accompany their diet with an invaluable program of strength-building exercises and tips for maintaining motivation.  To help you put their plan into action, the Eades provide:

* complete, satisfying meal plans, suitable for family dinners or formalentertaining

* a Daily Meal Outline to keep track of your food selections

* tips on making the best selections at fine restaurants or fast food chains

* a minicookbook filled with nearly 100 easy-to-prepare and tasty recipes, from TexMex Cheese Flan with Chunky Salsa and Coconut Salmon to Irish Lace Cookie and Chocolate Chip Cheesecake

* ways to modify the foods you love the most to make them fit your diet plan

* recipes for snack foods that can actually improve your health

* supplements that will jump-start your metabolism to burn fat

* a rapid recovery program for planned celebrations or holiday overindulgence

If you've been living the low-fat, no-fat way and still haven't lost weight (or been able to maintain weight loss), still have elevated blood pressure and cholesterol still feel fatigued and bloated--stop blaming yourself! Instead, turn to the Eades' breakthrough eating plan and let them help you regain your health and vitality--and show you how to maintain these benefits for a lifetime.

Protein Power: The High-Protein/Low-Carbohydrate Way to Lose Weight, Feel Fit, and Boost Your Health--in Just Weeks

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Dr. Bernstein's Diabetes Solution: The Complete Guide to Achieving Normal Blood Sugars

Originally published in 1997, DR. BERNSTEIN'S DIABETES SOLUTION is a unique resource that covers both adult- and childhood-onset diabetes, explains step-by-step how to normalize blood sugar levels and prevent or reverse complications, and offers detailed guidelines for establishing a treatment plan. Readers will find fifty gourmet recipes, in addition to a comprehensive discussion of diet, obesity, and new drugs to curb carbohydrate craving and overeating.

Now in its fourth edition, the book presents up-to-the-minute information on insulin resistance, blood-testing devices, measuring blood sugar, new types of insulin, gastroparesis and other issues, as well as updated diet guidelines. DR. BERNSTEIN'S DIABETES SOLUTION is the one book every diabetic must own.

Dr. Bernstein's Diabetes Solution: The Complete Guide to Achieving Normal Blood Sugars

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Life Without Bread: How a Low-Carbohydrate Diet Can Save Your Life

Based on more than 40 years of clinical research, this illuminating book unravels the mysteries of nutrition and shows that changing the way we eat can help us feel better and live longer. It describes how a low-carbohydrate/high-protein diet can prevent cancer, diabetes, heart disease, and obesity, as well as increase strength, endurance, and muscle mass.


  • Foreword to the First English Edition

W. Lutz's book "Life Without Bread" has seen nine German editions and is now available in English. Although its provocative theories have found not only agreement but also opposition it nevertheless always offers stimulating reading . The twentieth century has been dominated by the "lipid theory" of arteriosclerosis. This theory assumes that the leading causes of death (heart attacks, strokes) which are complications of arteriosclerosis are adversely affected by lipids such as cholesterol and "saturated" (animal) fats but are counteracted by unsaturated vegetable fats. The theory is accepted by leading scientific organizations and supported by powerful commercial interests . Lutz's ideas have challenged the lipid theory which also some others (like myself) believe to be bullton sand. Lutz's treatment of the subject of carbohydrates vs protein-fat consumption is quite ingenuous. He studied the evolutionary development of food consumption and concludes that during the last 5,000 years a relatively sudden change has occurred by the introduction of high amounts of starches. On this basis he favors the return to the early practices to which man was accustomed. He claims that a protein-fat diet has advantages in the treatment of many conditions. Lutz's approach is controversial but his ideas deserve to be tested.

Hans Kaunitz M.D.

Clinical Professor of Pathology (retired)
Columbia University, New York

  • Foreword to the Fifth German Edition

The first edition of this book appeared in 1967. It was a courageous feat, at a time when fat was held to be responsible for coronary infarction and many other diseases, to recommend the restriction of nutritional carbohydrate to 60 - 70 grams per day. An organization supported by the German government had even stated, without offering plausible supporting evidence, that an office employee "requires" 350 grams of carbohydrate daily ... Lutz stirred up a hornet's nest! In the ensuing years evidence from other sources and his own extensive experience have confirmed the value of his concept. "Leben ohne Brot" has become almost a slogan and the appearance of this fifth edition is convincing evidence of the impact caused by Lutz's ideas on the medical and lay public.

This book is intended primarily but not exclusively for the medical profession. Observations on his own person combined with clinical experience were the starting point for the "Life without Bread" programme. Even those who can not entirely accept Lutz's concepts and hypotheses regarding pathogenesis cannot afford to ignore this book. Clinical observations cannot be talked out of existence nor should they be dismissed simply because they conflict with one's own theories. The value of a diet can only be judged on the basis of clinical experience and practical success, and does not depend upon biochemical and physiological explanations.

Lutz's book challenges physicians to gather data on a "Life without Bread". It is an appeal to us to document results in the prophylaxis and therapy of adiposity, peptic ulcers, ulcerative colitis, hepatitis, arteriosclerosis and coronary infarction as well as to record our form of diet on which mankind lived for at least two millions years.

Prof. Hans Glatzel, Gross Groenau, Luebeck
Specialist in Internal Medicine,
Formerly Head of the Department of Clinical Physiology at the Max Planck Institute for Nutritional Physiology, Dortmund, West Germany

Life Without Bread: How a Low-Carbohydrate Diet Can Save Your Life

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9

Grass-Fed Cattle: How to Produce and Market Natural Beef

Successfully raise grass-fed cattle and enjoy the benefits of great-tasting beef and a financially stable enterprise. In this comprehensive guide, Julius Ruechel covers every aspect of raising healthy and thriving grass-fed cattle, offering advice on herd selection, pasture management, medical care, necessary equipment, winter grazing, slaughtering procedures, and more. With tips on creating a viable business plan and identifying niche markets for your beef, Ruechel provides everything you need to know to develop a profitable and environmentally sustainable grass-fed cattle operation.

Grass-Fed Cattle: How to Produce and Market Natural Beef

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Good Calories, Bad Calories: Challenging the Conventional Wisdom on Diet, Weight Control, and Disease

In this groundbreaking book, the result of seven years of research in every science connected with the impact of nutrition on health, award-winning science writer Gary Taubes shows us that almost everything we believe about the nature of a healthy diet is wrong.

For decades we have been taught that fat is bad for us, carbohydrates better, and that the key to a healthy weight is eating less and exercising more. Yet with more and more people acting on this advice, we have seen unprecedented epidemics of obesity and diabetes. Taubes argues persuasively that the problem lies in refined carbohydrates (white flour, sugar, easily digested starches) and sugars–via their dramatic and longterm effects on insulin, the hormone that regulates fat accumulation–and that the key to good health is the kind of calories we take in, not the number. There are good calories, and bad ones.

Good Calories
These are from foods without easily digestible carbohydrates and sugars. These foods can be eaten without restraint.
Meat, fish, fowl, cheese, eggs, butter, and non-starchy vegetables. 

Bad Calories
These are from foods that stimulate excessive insulin secretion and so make us fat and increase our risk of chronic disease—all refined and easily digestible carbohydrates and sugars. The key is not how much vitamins and minerals they contain, but how quickly they are digested. (So apple juice or even green vegetable juices are not necessarily any healthier than soda.) 
Bread and other baked goods, potatoes, yams, rice, pasta, cereal grains, corn, sugar (sucrose and high fructose corn syrup), ice cream, candy, soft drinks, fruit juices, bananas and other tropical fruits, and beer. 

Taubes traces how the common assumption that carbohydrates are fattening was abandoned in the 1960s when fat and cholesterol were blamed for heart disease and then –wrongly–were seen as the causes of a host of other maladies, including cancer. He shows us how these unproven hypotheses were emphatically embraced by authorities in nutrition, public health, and clinical medicine, in spite of how well-conceived clinical trials have consistently refuted them. He also documents the dietary trials of carbohydrate-restriction, which consistently show that the fewer carbohydrates we consume, the leaner we will be. 

With precise references to the most significant existing clinical studies, he convinces us that there is no compelling scientific evidence demonstrating that saturated fat and cholesterol cause heart disease, that salt causes high blood pressure, and that fiber is a necessary part of a healthy diet. Based on the evidence that does exist, he leads us to conclude that the only healthy way to lose weight and remain lean is to eat fewer carbohydrates or to change the type of the carbohydrates we do eat, and, for some of us, perhaps to eat virtually none at all.

The 11 Critical Conclusions of Good Calories, Bad Calories: 

1. Dietary fat, whether saturated or not, does not cause heart disease. 
2. Carbohydrates do, because of their effect on the hormone insulin. The more easily-digestible and refined the carbohydrates and the more fructose they contain, the greater the effect on our health, weight, and well-being. 
3. Sugars—sucrose (table sugar) and high fructose corn syrup specifically—are particularly harmful. The glucose in these sugars raises insulin levels; the fructose they contain overloads the liver.
4. Refined carbohydrates, starches, and sugars are also the most likely dietary causes of cancer, Alzheimer’s Disease, and the other common chronic diseases of modern times. 
5. Obesity is a disorder of excess fat accumulation, not overeating and not sedentary behavior. 
6. Consuming excess calories does not cause us to grow fatter any more than it causes a child to grow taller. 
7. Exercise does not make us lose excess fat; it makes us hungry. 
8. We get fat because of an imbalance—a disequilibrium—in the hormonal regulation of fat tissue and fat metabolism. More fat is stored in the fat tissue than is mobilized and used for fuel. We become leaner when the hormonal regulation of the fat tissue reverses this imbalance. 
9. Insulin is the primary regulator of fat storage. When insulin levels are elevated, we stockpile calories as fat. When insulin levels fall, we release fat from our fat tissue and burn it for fuel. 
10. By stimulating insulin secretion, carbohydrates make us fat and ultimately cause obesity. By driving fat accumulation, carbohydrates also increase hunger and decrease the amount of energy we expend in metabolism and physical activity.
11. The fewer carbohydrates we eat, the leaner we will be. 

Good Calories, Bad Calories is a tour de force of scientific investigation–certain to redefine the ongoing debate about the foods we eat and their effects on our health.

Good Calories, Bad Calories: Challenging the Conventional Wisdom on Diet, Weight Control, and Disease

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10

Imagining Head Smashed In: Aboriginal Buffalo Hunting on the Northern Plains

At the place known as Head-Smashed-In in southwestern Alberta, Aboriginal people practiced a form of group hunting for nearly 6,000 years before European contact. The large communal bison traps of the Plains were the single greatest food-getting method ever developed in human history. Hunters, working with their knowledge of the land and of buffalo behaviour, drove their quarry over a cliff and into wooden corrals. The rest of the group butchered the kill in the camp below. Author Jack Brink, who devoted 25 years of his career to “The Jump,” has chronicled the cunning, danger, and triumph in the mass buffalo hunts and the culture they supported. He also recounts the excavation of the site and the development of the Head-Smashed-In Buffalo Jump Interpretive Centre, which has hosted 2 million visitors since it opened in 1987. Brink’s masterful blend of scholarship and public appeal is rare in any discipline, but especially in North American pre-contact archaeology.

Imagining Head Smashed In: Aboriginal Buffalo Hunting on the Northern Plains

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