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Dr Cleghorn mentions the conclusions of some of his diabetic cases, saying one is stronger, while the other died from pneumonia and was unable to pursue the animal diet. He has also told many doctors in Western Scotland who have been using the meat diet to cure diabetes.

June 12, 1798

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Cases of the diabetes mellitus: with the results of the trials of certain acids

John Rollo

Type 2 Diabetes
Carnivore Diet

From Dr Cleghorn


I am just now treating a Gentleman in private practice with equal success. 


I examined John Rogers, (p. 168) today, and found that he had lived very irregularly. He keeps the tap in our prison, where he is much exposed to temptation; and his urine has from time to time become sweet, generally in proportion to his deviation from your rules; he is, however, much stronger, and has continued to be able to attend to his business.


John M'Lean, (p. 158) died last year, in the beginning of August. A month before he had been confined to bed by a violent pain darting from his breast-to-his back, accompanied with difficult breathing, and very severe cough. Having repeatedly recovered from similar attacks without medical aid, he waited till the 10th day, though I had requested him to let me know whenever he began to complain. On the 10th day of his disease I found him extremely hot and oppressed; his breathing hot and laborious, constrained by dreadful pains through the chest, and frequently interrupted by a most severe cough; by which, after violent straining, he brought up a quantity of pus or blood. His pulse was quick, and feeble, but sharp. His features were ghastly and expressive of great agony. His present were so different from his former feelings, that he gave up all hope of recovery, and in despair, not only refused to go again to the Infirmary, but was unwilling to try any remedies. Some of the ordinary ones, however, were used, to no purpose; and in the fifth week of his disease, after voiding a quantity of blood by stool, he expired. In the thorax were numerous adhesions, especjally on the lower part of the sternum, from which the lungs could scarcely be separated, and the separated surfaces were covered with a gelatinous mass; there were familiar adhesions in the posterior part of the right cavity, nearly opposite, in which direction, chiefly, the pain had darted; and also over a great part of the left cavity. Around the adhesions the structure of the lungs was much altered. There were many ulcers, some nearly empty, others full of pus and several parts apparently ruptured, were surrounded with masses of grumous blood. The bowels were very pale, but there was no hardness in any mesenteric gland. The kidneys appeared sound, only more flaccid than usual. That the pneumonia which destroyed this Patient was not connected with Diabetes, is abundantly certain, but it may perhaps be thought, that the animal food necessary for curing the one, tended to produce the other. This is true, though I imagine the great fatigue, and the frequent alternations of heat and cold to which he was exposed, might have produced pneumonia under any regimen. Indeed, it seems probable that he had partial adhesions in the chest before he came to the Infirmary, because every slight causes excited cough and pain in the breast; but the last attack was most violent from the beginning, and the time when evacuations might have checked its progress was unfortunately allowed to go by. I had the curiosity to taste his urine twice or thrice, but it was not sweet. 


From some friends, to whom I have sent or recommended your work, (which is now known over all the west of Scotland). I have learned other instances of success; but, as I do not know the particulars, I think it unnecessary to mention them. Last winter we had a complaint among horses, called by our Sarriers Jaw-pish marked by a great flow of clear urine, emaciation and weakness-— lately I obtained a portion of the urine of a horse labouring under this disease, and found it four; but I had not lesfure to examine it farther.