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Garrod, in a paper read at the International Medical Congress in 1881 on "Eczema and Albuminuria in Relation to Gout," affirms that each year strengthens his conviction that gout and eczema are most closely allied.

January 1, 1860

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Eczema and Albuminuria in Relation to Gout

Gout

The more persistent inflammatory lesions of the skin, such as eczema and psoriasis, which are characterized by long-continued hyperæmia with hyperplasia, are now recognized as among the possible transformations of gout. They are certainly often observed alternating with arthritic lesions, and associated with all the characteristic derangements of nutrition which belong to the gouty habit. The frequency of the various forms of acne, the inflammatory, as well as those which result from excessive function of the glands, in persons having a strong gouty inheritance, is recognized by many dermatologists. I have noticed these lesions especially in young women belonging to gouty families. They are generally accompanied by marked dyspeptic symptoms, and not infrequently by neurotic derangements.


Garrod, in a paper read at the International Medical Congress in 1881 on "Eczema and Albuminuria in Relation to Gout," affirms that each year strengthens his conviction that gout and eczema are most closely allied. Since his attention was first called to this relation in 1860, he has found a gradually increasing percentage of eczema in the cases of gout that have come under his observation. Dividing all the cases from 1860 to 1881 into ten groups, he found the percentage rose from 10 in the first group to 47 in the tenth. He accounts for this rapid increase in the percentage in the fact that in the first few years the eczema was only observed when it was very patent; during the past two or three years he has had made more careful inquiries as to the presence of eczema or other skin eruption in every case of gout, and by these means has frequently discovered its presence when it might otherwise have been overlooked. Garrod believes that eczema is the special skin-lesion of gouty subjects, and does not regard psoriasis as having anything more than an accidental connection with gout. He admits that the latter is often associated with rheumatoid arthritis. It must be remembered, however, that Garrod does not admit that gout ever exists without lithatic deposits.