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Dr Cleghorn cures diabetes in John Roger after hearing of Rollo's work. "His diet was regulated with more care. For it was found, that all along he had used a great proportion of vegetables for food, and had been guilty of irregularity also in drinking. He was ordered to get no vegetables ; however, he was allowed one roll a day; the rest of his diet consisted of soup, blood-puddings, and butcher's meat roasted, or boiled, as he chose."

January 10, 1797

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From Dr. Cleghorn, Lecturer in Chemistry, and one of the Physicians to the Infirmary at Glasgow. Glasgow May 19 1797.

John Rollo

Facultative Carnivore
Type 2 Diabetes
Carnivore Diet

From Dr. Cleghorn, Lecturer in Chemistry, and one of the Physicians to the Infirmary at Glasgow. Glasgow May 19 1797. 


SOME months ago I was honoured with your excellent pamphlet on Diabetes. At that moment I had two diabetic patients in the Royal Infirmary of this place, and I began infiantly to treat them on your plan. They are both cured ; and I have delayed fo long to thank you for your politenefs, in the hope that I might be able to inform you of this new fuccefs. 


CASE II. John Roger, age 40, a Shoemaker. January 10th 1797:

 For two months his urine has been profuse, amounting daily to 20 pounds or more. It is limpid and sweet, yielding by evaporation an ounce of thick sweet matter, like treacle, from every pound. He is thin and weak; habitually thirsty; for some days pain has felt a pain between his shoulders, and for a week his legs have been cedematous. Appetite keen ; pulse and belly natural. Knows nothing to which he can attribute his complaint. Has used bitters, and other medicines, without material benefit. The astringent pills, and alum whey, were ordered for him, as for M'Lean, 

12th. Urine 36 pounds. 

13th. Urine 30 pounds. 

14th Urine 23 pounds. 

15th. Urine 20 pounds.

16th Urine 21 pounds; thirst excessive ; sleeps ill ; pulse full and hard. The medicines were omitted. He was directed to drink a folution of lixiva fulphurata, one drachm to four pounds of water, and to use animal food


April 3d. Issues by means of caustic were ordered to be formed over each kidney. He was directed to drink sparingly, chiefly lime water, and his diet was regulated with more care. For it was found, that all along he had used a great proportion of vegetables for food, and had been guilty of irregularity also in drinking. He was ordered to get no vegetables ; however, he was allowed one roll a day ; the rest of his diet consisted of soup, blood-puddings, and butcher's meat roasted, or boiled, as he chose. 


11th. Three stools. Feels himfelf stronger, and in better spirits. Pulfe 80. Drink 3 pounds (no lime water) ; urine 6§ pounds, nearly natural. 


12th, 13th and 14th. Thirst abated ; urine from 6 to 7 pounds/of natural taste and smell, and when evaporated yielded no sugar. Thus he continued free from thirst, though his mouth was parched and dry during the night ; he gained ftrength and flesh ; his urine never exceeded 6 pounds, and seemed perfectly natural till the 30th, When it again became sweet; having been strictly questioned, he confessed that he drank a quantity of small beer yesterday afternoon, and we have found that he has committed several other irregularities. 


May 1st. Urine again natural. This day he left the Infirmary, having promised to persist in the use of animal food, and to return if he should relapse. He is gone to Irvine, about 30 miles distant, and nothing has been heard from him since. 


These patients were examined daily in the Royal Infirmary of Glasgow, and the reports were dictated before the Students of whom many examined very scrupulously the changes of the urine, and all other circumstances respecting a disease to which their attention was strongly attracted both by the novelty of the treatment, and their having seen a case which ended fatally not long ago. In copying the reports I have omitted every circumstance that seemed uninfluential, and I have abridged the language so far as I thought consistent with perspicuity. I have dropped the Latin form of prescribing, though it gave me some trouble to exprefs the prescriptions shortly in English (and many of them look awkward enough) because I was desirous of making the cases intelligible to those who do not practise physic, as I hope this very interesting inquiry will soon excite the attention of the public. After stripping the cases of every necessary detail, I shall not load them with many additional remarks. They seem to me very strong confirmations of your doctrine, in every point, except what regards the hepatifed ammonia. At first perhaps it was not properly prepared, after a little while, however, it was ; and it seemed to have very little power over the urine. In one patient (but he was querulous and fanciful) it seemed to affect the head ; in the other, it seemed to act like common volatile alkali, by producing an agreeable sensation of warmth in the stomach. Our patients, indeed, were in many respects different from yours ; and it is very common to find the operation of medicines strangely modified by the varying habits and susceptibilities of patients. The alum whey (formed by boiling a drachm of alum in a pint of milk) seemed to produce considerable effect, at least in reducing the quantity of urine. The castor oil appears to be the most useful laxative; but no medicine was of any permanent advantage without the aid of animal food. This is more powerful than any medicine, and very probably this alone, properly managed, may be found sufficient for the cure in many cases. Whether the cure in our two patients be complete or not, is a question which I shall not labour to decide by argument. For my own part I think they are cured, though they may never perhaps be strong as they were, and both may probably relapse ; because, being poor, they are exposed to the double risk of severe labour, and improper food. Besides, on many other occasions, a tendency to relapse is not considered as a proof of imperfect cure. Is an intermittent not cured, because one who has had it this spring, will be found very subject to it next season, if he shall be exposed to the cause which commonly produces it?