Historical Events

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"What about the airplanes? You watch the white man fly in the air, while the Inuit must walk."
"Oh, Falla," they laugh. "We ourselves had medicine men who could fly. This one, and that one. And without wings or engines either."

January 1, 1951

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Inuk

Roger Buliard

Religion
Eskimo

The greatest scorn is reserved for the Great Eyebrows, the despised Krabloonak. He is less than dirt. Part of this contempt stems from the failure of the whites to recognize the good qualities of the Eskimos, and is justified, but now it is carried to the point of absurdity. "Krabloonak ayortok!" the Eskimo says, summing it up. "The white man is useless. A good for nothing."


Too many times the Inuit have watched the white man starve while they, the Eskimos, were doing nicely. 

Too many times have they seen the Eyebrows, physically softer, not knowing the country, stumble and fall, to die on the trail, while an Inuk would have thought the trip nothing but a pleasant walk.

Too many times have they seen wihte men around them--sailors, Police, traders, missionaries--not even try to hunt, but content themselves with purchases made at the trading store.

Moreover, the Eskimo asks, when the white man travels, can he go alone, as I do? No! He needs a guide! A nurse!

Can the white man build a snowhouse, or harpoon a seal, or speak Eskimo? No.

"Krabloonak ayortok!"...."The White man does not know a thing!"

The wihte man is useless, an incompetent. Then one day the Eskimo sees a prospector looking at rocks or a geologist digging up polygons, and that is the end. The white man is not only useles,s a know nothing. He is crazy.

You say to them, "Now, look here, boy. Who gave you those knives, boats, rifles?"

They will answer, "Well, before that we had our copper knives. Better, maybe. We had our kayaks. You have the material, maybe. But there's a lot we do that you can't do. For you know nothing. You are worthless."

"What about the airplanes? You watch the white man fly in the air, while the Inuit must walk."

"Oh, Falla," they laugh. "We ourselves had medicine men who could fly. This one, and that one. And without wings or engines either."