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He was restricted to animal food. His skin, formerly arid, became soft and moist; in proportion to the abatement of his appetite and thirst, he gained flesh and strength; and his urine, acquiring daily more and more of the natural appearance.

June 12, 1798

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Cases of the diabetes mellitus : with the results of the trials of certain acids

John Rollo

Type 2 Diabetes
Carnivore Diet

From Doctor Cleghorn. Glasgow, June 12, 1798. 


TOGETHER with the conclusion of John M'Lean's Case, I have sent a short account of four other Patients, cured according to your plan in our Infirmary. As they were chiefly under the care of my learned Colleague, Dr. Freer, (for I attended them only during a few weeks in his absence) I requested him to write out their cases; but after considering them, he found them so exactly like those already published, that he thought a full detail of the symptoms or practice would lead to unprofitable repetitions. With his concurrence I have extracted the following particulars from the Infirmary Registers. 


One of the Patients was a Weaver, age. 35, of a dark complexion and stout make. The disease had continued 18 months, and arose, as he thought, from cold, to which he was exposed while under salivation from mercury. When admitted on the 9th of February, 1798, his urine, which was very sweet, amounted to 20 lb. daily; when dismissed, in the beginning of May, it varied from 4 to 5 lb. and had no sweetness. 


This Patient got no hepatifed ammonia. He was restricted to animal food, using water, lime water, or alum whey, for drink; he got occasionally laxatives, emetics, and pills containing extract of bark and steel. While he got eggs for supper, his appetite and thirst began to increase, for which reason they were omitted; but the chief peculiarity of his case consisted in the trifling effect of emetics upon him. Ten grains of tartarifed antimony excited no sickness, nor vomiting or purging ; seven grains of vitrified copper with the same quantity of ipecacuan, were equally ineffectual, as was also vitrioiated zinc given to the extent first of 30, afterwards of 35 grains. 


I do not ascribe this insensibility of the stomach to Diabetes, because I never met with it in other cases ; it certainly arose from a constitutional peculiarity as the Patient told me it had always been very difficult to make him vomit. In other respects his progress was quite similar to that already often described. His skin, formerly arid, became soft and moist; in proportion to the abatement of his appetite and thirst, he gained flesh and strength; and his urine, acquiring daily more and more of the natural appearance, during the last month of his fray in the Infirmary, most frequently amounted to 4, but never exceeded 5 lb. Nothing has been heard of this Patient since he left Glasgow, from which, as he lives in the neighbourhood, we conclude that he continues well, because he promised either to return or to write, if he should relapse.