Corporate Takeover of Nutrition

Corporate Takeover of Nutrition

Recent History

January 1, 1910

GreatWhiteOncomingSquare.jpg

The only fats that could be found in any American kitchen up until about 1910 were those that came exclusively from animals.

URL

As the accompanying graph shows, the only fats that could be found in any American kitchen up until about 1910 were those that came exclusively from animals: lard (the fat from pigs), suet (the fat from around an animal’s kidneys), tallow (a harder fat from sheep and cattle), butter, and cream. Some cottonseed and sesame oils were produced locally on farms in the South (the slaves brought sesame seeds from Africa), but none was produced nationally or in large quantities; and efforts to make olive oil foundered upon an inability to successfully cultivate olive trees (although no less a man than Thomas Jefferson tried). The fats used by housewives in the United States and also in most of Northern Europe were therefore those from animals. Cooking with oil was a largely unfamiliar idea.

 

Oils weren’t even considered edible. They didn’t belong in the kitchen. They were used to make soaps, candles, waxes, cosmetics, varnishes, linoleum, resins, lubricants, and fuels—all of which were increasingly needed for burgeoning urban populations as well as the machinery of industrialization in the nineteenth century. Whale oil was the primary material for all these purposes starting in 1820; a boom in that oil’s production enriched two generations of New Englanders living on the coast, but the industry had collapsed by 1860.

January 1, 1917

GreatWhiteOncomingSquare.jpg

Margarine struggles to replace butter until government drops taxes and restrictions.

URL

Event Rich Text

January 1, 1924

GreatWhiteOncomingSquare.jpg

The American Heart Association is formed.

American Heart Association is Founded: Six cardiologists form the American Heart Association as a professional society for doctors. One of the founders, Dr. Paul Dudley White, described the early years as a time of “almost unbelievable ignorance” about heart disease.

January 1, 1939

Weston A. Price

Nutrition and Physical Degeneration

GreatWhiteOncomingSquare.jpg

Price, a dentist, travels the world to see pre-western diet populations and their incredible health.

Dr. Weston A. Price (1870-1948), a Cleveland dentist, has been called the “Isaac Newton of Nutrition.” In his search for the causes of dental decay and physical degeneration that he observed in his dental practice, he turned from test tubes and microscopes to unstudied evidence among human beings. Dr. Price sought the factors responsible for fine teeth among the people who had them–isolated non-industrialized people.

The world became his laboratory. As he traveled, his findings led him to the belief that dental caries and deformed dental arches resulting in crowded, crooked teeth and unattractive appearance were merely a sign of physical degeneration, resulting from what he had suspected–nutritional deficiencies.

Price traveled the world over in order to study isolated human groups, including sequestered villages in Switzerland, Gaelic communities in the Outer Hebrides, Eskimos and Indians of North America, Melanesian and Polynesian South Sea Islanders, African tribes, Australian Aborigines, New Zealand Maori and the Indians of South America. Wherever he went, Dr. Price found that beautiful straight teeth, freedom from decay, stalwart bodies, resistance to disease and fine characters were typical of native people on their traditional diets, rich in essential food factors.

January 1, 1941

GreatWhiteOncomingSquare.jpg

Nutrition Foundation, a Big Food organization was more powerful than the meat/dairy/eggs industry.

Event Rich Text

Ancient History

Books

The Vegetarian Myth: Food, Justice, and Sustainability

Published:

May 1, 2009

The Vegetarian Myth: Food, Justice, and Sustainability

Big Fat Lies: How The Diet Industry Is Making You Sick, Fat & Poor

Published:

February 22, 2012

Big Fat Lies: How The Diet Industry Is Making You Sick, Fat & Poor

Fat Chance: Beating the Odds Against Sugar, Processed Food, Obesity, and Disease

Published:

December 27, 2012

Fat Chance: Beating the Odds Against Sugar, Processed Food, Obesity, and Disease

The Case for Keto: Rethinking Weight Control and the Science and Practice of Low-Carb/High-Fat Eating

Published:

December 29, 2020

The Case for Keto: Rethinking Weight Control and the Science and Practice of Low-Carb/High-Fat Eating

Metabolical: The Lure and the Lies of Processed Food, Nutrition, and Modern Medicine

Published:

May 4, 2021

Metabolical: The Lure and the Lies of Processed Food, Nutrition, and Modern Medicine